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Shioiri et al (2006) The effects of a synbiotic fermented milk beverage containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides on defecation frequency, intestinal microflora, organic acid concentrations, and putrefactive metabolites of sub-optimal health state volunteers: a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study

Shioiri et al (2006) The effects of a synbiotic fermented milk beverage containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides on defecation frequency, intestinal microflora, organic acid concentrations, and putrefactive metabolites of sub-optimal health state volunteers: a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study

Citation

Shioiri, T, Yahagi, K, Nakayama, S, Asahara, T, Yuki, N, Kawakami, K, Yamaoka, Y, Sakai, Y, Nomoto, K and Totani, M (2006) The effects of a synbiotic fermented milk beverage containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides on defecation frequency, intestinal microflora, organic acid concentrations, and putrefactive metabolites of sub-optimal health state volunteers: a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study. Bioscience Microflora 25(4):137-146

Objective

To evaluate the effect of a synbiotic fermented milk drink (L. casei Shirota at 3 x 1010; transgalactosylated oligosaccharides at 2.5 g per 80 ml) on the bowel habits of constipated women, and bowel habits and markers of gut health in healthy elderly persons.

Methods

Subjects were selected for the study on the basis of a prior screen, which identified female students who were constipated and elderly people with apparently abnormal gut microflora and levels of putrefactive intestinal metabolites. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, 35 female university students and 20 healthy elderly people were given one bottle (80 ml) a day of the synbiotic or a placebo. The subjects were allocated randomly to a treatment sequence (synbiotic-placebo or placebo-synbiotic), with each intervention period lasting two weeks and separated by a washout period of three weeks. Evaluation of benefit was by measurement of defecation frequency, number of days with bowel movements, stool quantity, and assessment of changes in the intestinal milieu by microbiological and biochemical analysis of faeces. 

Results

For the constipated students, after one week of synbiotic intervention, their defecation frequency increased significantly compared to the baseline frequency (P P

Faecal analysis of the elderly subjects showed an increase in bifidobacteria and lactobacilli associated with the synbiotic intervention (P P P P L. casei Shirota was recovered during the intervention period at 107 CFU per gram of faeces.

Compared to the placebo intervention, faecal levels of acetic acid were significantly higher in the synbiotic group (P P

Table. Changes in bowel movements (frequency per week) with synbiotic (constipated students)

Intervention

Before intake

Week 1 of intake

Week 2 of intake

Synbiotic

4.0 ± 1.5

5.0 ± 2.1* **

4.1 ± 1.7

Placebo

4.4 ± 2.2

4.1 ± 1.7

4.6 ± 2.0

*Comparison with placebo intervention: P

**Comparison between baseline and week 1 on intake P

Conclusions

The authors concluded that ingestion of the synbiotic containing L. casei Shirota and GOS, can improve parameters of faecal quality, the intestinal microbiota and the intestinal milieu.

 
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